Kidney Failure

Kidney failure sign

by Agatha Thrash, M.D.

Uremia is a condition caused when kidneys fail and waste products back up into the bloodstream. Normally, wastes are filtered out through thousands of tiny nephrons in the kidneys and channeled into small tubes leading to the urinary bladder, while the cleansed blood is turned back into general circulation.

Common substances we eat, or are exposed to, can act as irritants to the nephrons. These include such things as coffee, tea, colas, chocolate, pepper, mustard, ginger, vinegar, alcohol, tobacco, many drugs, and industrial chemicals, to name a few. Little by little the filtering cells deteriorate. Since no pain is involved, often the damage is not noted until many years have gone by, and the condition is irreversible.

Many helpful suggestions can be made in the treatment of kidney failure, most especially the Eight Natural Laws of Health.

God created man with four times as much kidney capacity as is necessary to maintain normal cleansing of the blood. However, the abuse of the kidneys day by day reduces the safety margin until one day a serious overload is placed on them by illness or accumulated degeneration. Symptoms may include swelling of the body, perspiration that develops the odor of urine, nausea, loss of appetite, and vision impairment. Nerves may also become so hypersensitive that a loud noise, jolting the bed, or slamming a door may greatly startle or irritate the patient.

Protein and Vegetarian Diet

Our modern high-protein diet has a harmful influence on the kidneys by increasing internal blood pressure and forcing a higher blood flow and filtration workload on them. When disease strikes the kidneys, this progression intensifies.

However, a vegetarian diet can slow down or even stop the build-up of toxic wastes. Restricting protein intake reduces the workload of the surviving nephrons, minimizing further loss of renal tissue.

While we can survive on about one half of one kidney, overuse damage to the remaining glomeruli—the tiny tufts of capillaries that carry blood within the kidneys—is evidenced by increased protein in the urine. If a patient who has lost three fourths of his renal mass is given a protein-restricted diet, the subsequent progression of glomerular sclerosis will be reduced significantly.

The quantity of protein used should be barely enough to maintain a degree of strength and low-normal blood proteins. Twenty to 40 grams of protein daily should be quite adequate. Some weight loss can be expected because of the nature of kidney disease, and due to loss of fat and some muscle mass. This is offset somewhat by fluid retention, which accounts for some weight gain between five and 20 pounds.

Since potassium is high in many fruits, and phosphorus is high in many grains, those who need to pay attention to these features of blood chemistry should be guided accordingly. Sometimes a uremic patient may be able to stay off dialysis by a rigidly low-protein diet. Patients even may be able to reduce the time spent in dialysis, if they adopt a spartan dietary regimen.

Our modern high-protein diet has a harmful influence on the kidneys by increasing internal blood pressure and forcing a higher blood flow and filtration workload on them.

For many decades the low-protein diet has been promoted as a method of slowing or stopping the progression of the disease in the majority of patients. With early intervention, 61 percent will achieve a stabilization of kidney function regardless of age, sex, or their general health.

Many helpful suggestions can be made in the treatment of kidney failure, most especially the Eight Natural Laws of Health. These are: fresh air, proper sunshine, a good diet, exercise (even when you don’t feel like it), pure water, strict temperance in all things, rest (in the form of short stops or naps during the day and seven to eight hours sleep at night), and trust in divine power. They will do wonders!

—From the October 2011 issue of 3ABN World

 

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